Pre-budget Consultations 2013 – Canadian Alliance on Mental Illness and Mental Health

Pre-budget Consultations 2013 – Canadian Alliance on Mental Illness and Mental Health

Implement Canada’s mental health strategy. National leadership (federal, provincial, civil society) can create an action plan to address mental illness and mental health 1) Increase the proportion of health spending devoted to mental health from 7% to 9% 2) Increase the proportion of social spending devoted to mental health by 2% from current levels 3) Create a mental health innovation fund to be used to expand the role of primary health care in meeting mental health needs, set standards for wait times for mental health services and improve access to necessary mental health services.

Expected cost or savings: From the pull-down menus, please indicate the expected cost or savings of your recommendation to the federal government and the period of time to which the expected cost or savings is related.

$1 billion or more
5 or more years

Federal funding: Please provide a precise indication of how the federal government could fund your recommendation. For example, indicate what federal spending should be reallocated, what federal tax measure(s) should be introduced, eliminated or changed, etc.

Increase the proportion of health and social transfers to provinces and territories dedicated to addressing mental health and mental illness as Canada’s contribution to meeting and surpassing elements of the WHO’s Comprehensive Mental Health Action Plan 2013-2020.

Intended beneficiaries: Please indicate the groups of individuals, the sector(s) and/or the regions that would benefit by implementation of your recommendation.

All Canadians (employers, employees, volunteers, family caregivers and taxpayers) would benefit from better outcomes and/or improved personal and societal economic benefits. 1 in 5 Canadians each year will be affected by a mental illness and it is estimated to cost the Canadian economy well in excess of $50 billion dollars annually. Mental health problems and illnesses account for nearly 30 per cent of short and long-term disability claims and more than $6 billion in lost productivity. Young adults in their prime working years are also among the hardest hit by mental health problems.

General impacts: Depending on the nature of your recommendation, please indicate how the standard of living of Canadians would be improved, jobs would be created, people would be trained, etc.

Mental health problems and illnesses cost Canada well in excess of $50 billion annually. In ten years, this annual cost will rise to $88.8 billion and the cumulative cost over the same period will be $623.3 billion. Clearly, not all impacts can be avoided. However, according to the Life and Economic Impact of Major Mental Illnesses in Canada Study, a reduction in the overall all-cause incidence by 10% would result in annual savings of 4 billion. This would increase GDP by 1% over 5 years.

Topic: Federal budgets and the public service

As a large employer, the Federal Government can create psychologically effective workplaces for their employees which will in turn save tax dollars and improve the workforce. Creating mentally healthy workplaces will benefits workers, their families, and employers, while contributing to the economic prosperity of the country. 1) Increase the extended health plans it offers to its employees in order to provide meaningful coverage for psychological treatments. 2) Implement the National Standard for Psychological Health and Safety in the Workplace in the Federal Public Service.

Expected cost or savings: From the pull-down menus, please indicate the expected cost or savings of your recommendation to the federal government and the period of time to which the expected cost or savings is related.

unknown

Immediately

Federal funding: Please provide a precise indication of how the federal government could fund your recommendation. For example, indicate what federal spending should be reallocated, what federal tax measure(s) should be introduced, eliminated or changed, etc.

Treasury Board has announced that it plans to modernize the disability management system. Increasing the extended health plans it offers to its employees and implementing the national standard could be part of that improvement process.

Intended beneficiaries: Please indicate the groups of individuals, the sector(s) and/or the regions that would benefit by implementation of your recommendation.

Mental health issues have become the most significant cause of disability claims in Canada. In 2011, the public service disability plan, administered by Sun Life took in 3,875 new claims, more than 47% of which were for mental health conditions led by depression and anxiety. Last year, on any given day,19,000 public servants were on sick leave. In 2013, the federal public service has an annual absenteeism rate that is two-and-a-half times the private sector rate of 6.7 days.

Creating mentally healthy workplaces will benefits workers, their families, and Canadian tax payers.

General impacts: Depending on the nature of your recommendation, please indicate how the standard of living of Canadians would be improved, jobs would be created, people would be trained, etc.

Federal Government leadership can have a strong effect on changes in all Canadian workplaces, where at least 1 in 5 working Canadians are affected by a mental health problem or illness. The cost of this loss in productivity was $6.4 billion in 2011, and is expected to increase to $16.0 billion in 2041. According to the U.K. National Institute for Health and Clinical Excellence, improving the management of mental health in the workplace could decrease losses to productivity by as much as 30% and result in annual savings of £250,607 ($397,713) in an organization of 1000 employees.

Topic: Health

Building on Economic Action Plan 2013 announcement of $2 million by the Public Health Agency of Canada (PHAC) “to improve data collection and reporting of mental illness and mental health”, that the Federal Government establish a pan-Canadian project team involving members of Northern communities with personal and expert knowledge related to mental health and wellness, PHAC, CAMIMH, CIHI, and the CIHR Strategy on Patient-Oriented Research (CIHRSPOR) to design improved mental health and mental illness surveillance programs and indicators.

Expected cost or savings: From the pull-down menus, please indicate the expected cost or savings of your recommendation to the federal government and the period of time to which the expected cost or savings is related.

unknown

Immediately

Federal funding: Please provide a precise indication of how the federal government could fund your recommendation. For example, indicate what federal spending should be reallocated, what federal tax measure(s) should be introduced, eliminated or changed, etc.

This may mean reallocating funds within Health Canada and the CIHR. This would involve the identification and coordination of existing funds within the named agencies or departments, and the implementation of a collaborative and inclusive approach to designing integrated new services and programs based on better data (which PHAC will already be collecting).

Costs savings: significant but unknown.

Intended beneficiaries: Please indicate the groups of individuals, the sector(s) and/or the regions that would benefit by implementation of your recommendation.

All Canadians, including urban, rural-remote populations, vulnerable groups, Northern populations, First Nations, Aboriginals, Métis, and Inuit.

General impacts: Depending on the nature of your recommendation, please indicate how the standard of living of Canadians would be improved, jobs would be created, people would be trained, etc.

Canada has a flagging birth rate, an aging population and a labour force that will soon feature 2 workers for every retired person. We need to increase productivity to achieve long-term economic growth and sustained increases in individuals’ standards of living. The Aboriginal population is the fastest-growing cohort of the Canadian population. Data collection and reporting are necessary and integral components to understanding local needs and ensuring that current and future spending has the greatest possibility of reaching the social and clinical outcomes we want.

Please use this page if you wish to provide more explanation about your recommendation(s).

The Canadian Alliance on Mental Illness and Mental Health (CAMIMH) is an alliance of national mental health organizations comprised of health providers and organizations representing persons with mental illness and their families and caregivers. CAMIMH’s mandate is to ensure that mental health is placed on the national agenda in order to improve the mental health of all Canadians and ensure that persons with a lived experience of mental illness and their families receive appropriate access to care and support. http://camimh.ca

CAMIMH believes that the federal government has a crucial role to play when it comes to funding health, health care and social services, participating in innovation, and by collaborating with the provinces and territories in the area of mental health. CAMIMH advocated for the creation of the Mental Health Commission of Canada (MHCC) and is very pleased that we now have a national strategy on mental health. CAMIMH strongly supports Canada’s Mental Health Strategy.

In addition to impacts on working age Canadians referenced above under Recommendation 1, implementing our recommendations would help people avoid interactions with the criminal justice system, and in turn, avoid lost income, delayed careers, personal and family distress.
In 2011, an estimated 1.04 million young people aged 9-19 were living with a mental illness. This represents 23.4% or nearly one in four young people. Children and youth who experience a mental illness are at much higher risk of experiencing a mental illness as adults.
With 85,000 children in Canada currently estimated to experience a conduct disorder, if proven programs were to prevent just 10% of this incidence (8,500 conduct disorder cases) as much as $3.1 billion in potential lifetime savings could be realized.

Furthermore, we know that Canadians are living longer. Findings from the Life and Economic Impact of Major Mental Illnesses in Canada Study show that as people 70 years of age and older live longer with mental health problems and illnesses, there is a higher likelihood of increased social and economic burdens related to dementia, anxiety and mood disorders, on top of the chronic physical illnesses which we know are also more likely to impact people later in life.

CAMIMH recognizes that the Federal Government, in Economic Action Plan 2013, has allocated “$4 million over two years to increase the number of mental health wellness teams serving First Nations communities.” Specific to Recommendation 3, CAMIMH believe that the creation of mental health wellness teams, if done locally and with the involvement of the community it aims to serve, will be consistent with observed outcomes from research which strongly encourage the “full involvement of consumers and families in mental health systems that are community focused and recovery oriented”. However, to do this effectively, we need better data and better, more targeted collaboration between partners such as CIHR, PHAC and CIHI.

/ Pré-budget @fr

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